Alan Richardson

When you already know how to code, it's easy to forget how hard some of that learning was... until you have to teach people. And if all you've ever built are applications, you don't know really know the nuances of writing code to automate them. And if you've written the code but never had to market the applications then you've not really experienced the full joy of coding.

In this presentation Alan will revisit many of his past projects to identify lessons learned. Lessons from: writing commercial and open source tools, multi-user adventure games, REST APIs, test automation, automating applications to make them do things they are not supposed to do, and coding for technical marketing.

Some lessons we will learn:

  • The 'install' is the hardest part
  • Writing frameworks is too much fun and should be banned
  • Applications are just "code calling other libraries"
  • Writing a Text Adventure s the most fun and educational thing you'll ever code
  • The Dangers of knowing how to code

We will also learn the dangers of knowing how to code and discover how our coding skills can give us an edge, in business and online live in general, if we choose to harness our skills to improve our daily experiences.

About the Speaker

alan richardson

Alan Richardson has more than twenty years of professional IT experience, working as a programmer and at every level of the testing hierarchy from tester through head of testing. He has performed keynote speeches and tutorials at conferences worldwide. Author of four books, including "Dear Evil Tester", and "Java For Testers". Alan also has created online training courses to help people learn Technical Web Testing and Selenium WebDriver with Java. He works as an independent consultant, helping companies improve their use of automation, agile, and exploratory technical testing.

Alan posts his writing and training videos on EvilTester.com, and CompendiumDev.co.uk. Alan is the programmer behind: RestMud - a multi-user text adventure game used for teaching technical testing, Buggy Games - a set of 'bad' JavaScript games for teaching JavaScript and Browser Dev tool hacking, and Chatterscan.com - an opinionated Twitter client.

Schedule

08:30 Registration
09:20 Opening
09:30 Talk #1
10:10 Coffee, Speedmeeting
10:40 Talk #2
11:20 Talk #3
12:00 Talk #4
12:30 Lunch
13:30 Lightning Talks
14:30 Talk #5
15:00 Coffee, Speedmeeting
15:40 Talk #6
16:20 Talk #7
17:00 Talk #8
17:30 Drinks/dinner
20:00 Doors Close